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  • AB0975 Does platelet rich plasma change the volumetric findings of mri imaging? (A Randomised Clinical Trial)

    Abstract

    Background Several studies have shown the effect of platelet rich plasma (PRP) on knee osteoarthritis. Most of these studies have focused on subjective and clinical symptoms effect of PRP and fewer papers have studied its objective effect on cartilage. MRI is the gold standard imaging for cartilage lesion.

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  • Rehabilitation of hamstring strains: does a single injection of platelet-rich plasma improve outcomes? (Clinical study)

    Purpose: The study aims to elucidate the effects of single platelet-rich plasma (PRP) injection combined with rehabilitation exercises on growth factor concentrations and muscle strength following hamstring tear injury.

    Methods: 17 physically active male athletes (22.3 years; 1.80 m; 74.7 kg; 24.9 kg/m2) with a 2nd-grade acute hamstring tear were randomized to a treatment group (n = 8) or control group (n = 9). Both groups received the same physical rehabilitation program for 8 weeks; however, only the treatment group received an autologous single PRP injection.

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  • Platelet-rich plasma therapy in refractory knee osteoarthritis combined with infection

    Abstract: Objective: To clarify the clinical efficacy of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) in the treatment of patients with refractory knee osteoarthritis (KOA) combined with infection. Methods: Between June 2014 and June 2016, 60 refractory KOA patients with infection (non-pyogenic infection) admitted to Ningbo NO.6 Hospital were recruited in this study. The patients were randomly assigned to receive either PRP plus antibiotics (A group, n=30) or sodium hyaluronate and antibiotics (B group, n=30).

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  • Evaluating the Efficacy of Different Platelet-Rich Plasma Regimens for Management of Androgenetic Alopecia: A Single-Center, Blinded, Randomized Clinical Trial

    BACKGROUND Studies suggest platelet-rich plasma (PRP) may mitigate androgenetic alopecia (AGA), but each varies in the frequency of and interval between treatments.

    OBJECTIVE To compare the efficacy, satisfaction, tolerability, and safety of 2 initial PRP injection protocols over 6 months.

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  • Stem Cells for the Treatment of Knee Osteoarthritis: A Comprehensive Review

    Background: Knee osteoarthritis (KOA) is a very challenging condition to treat and can be resistant to medications, procedures, and even surgery. Surgery may not be an option for some patients due to obesity or comorbidities. Regenerative medicine utilizing stem cells, platelet rich plasma (PRP), amniotic fluid, and cytokine modulation is very promising in the treatment of KOA.

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  • Stem Cell Therapies for Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Stem cell therapies have been proposed as a treatment option for neurodegenerative diseases, but the best stem cell source and therapeutic efficacy for neuroregeneration remain uncertain. Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and neural stem cells (NSCs), which can efficiently generate neural cells, could be good candidates but they pose ethical and practical issues. Not only difficult to find the good source of those cells but also they alway pose immunorejection problem since they may not be an autologous cells.

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  • Treating Age-Related Diseases with Somatic Stem Cells

    Life expectancy in the developed world has advanced beyond the number of years in which healthy tissue homeostasis can be maintained, and as a result, the number of persons with severe and debilitating chronic illnesses, including cancer, diabetes, osteoarthritis, osteoporosis, neurodegenerative and cardiovascular disease has continued to rise. One of the key underlying causes for the loss in the ability to replenish damaged tissues is the qualitative and quantitative decline in somatic stem cell populations.

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  • Stem Cell Therapy for Osteonecrosis of the Femoral Head: Current Trends and Comprehensive Review

    Abstract

    Purpose of Review

    Osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH) is a common and frequently occurring disease. It is caused by interruption of blood supply with different etiologies. ONFH leads to degeneration and necrosis of the subchondral bone of the femoral head and eventually collapse of the femoral head. ONFH has a high disability rate, seriously affecting the quality of living of patients, and often involves middle-aged and younger people.

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  • A Comprehensive Review of Stem Cells for Cartilage Regeneration in Osteoarthritis

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is an age related joint disease associated with degeneration and loss of articular cartilage. Consequently, OA patients suffer from chronic joint pain and disability. Weight bearing joints and joints that undergo repetitive stress and excessive ‘wear and tear’ are particularly prone to developing OA. Cartilage has a poor regenerative capacity and current pharmacological agents only provide symptomatic pain relief.

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  • Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells Enhance Cartilage Repair in in vivo Osteochondral Defect Model

    Abstract

    This study characterized peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) in terms of their potential in cartilage repair and investigated their ability to improve the healing in a pre-clinical large animal model. Human PBMCs were isolated with gradient centrifugation and adherent PBMC’s were evaluated for their ability to differentiate into adipogenic, chondrogenic and osteogenic lineages and also for their expression of musculoskeletal genes. The phenotype of the PBMCs was evaluated using Stro-1, CD34, CD44, CD45, CD90, CD106, CD105, CD146 and CD166 cell surface markers. Osteochondral defects were created in the medial femoral condyle (MFC) of 24 Welsh mountain sheep and evaluated at a six month time point. Four cell treatment groups were evaluated in combination with collagen-GAG-scaffold: (1) MSC alone; (2) MSCs and PBMCs at a ratio of 20:1; (3) MSCs and PBMC at a ratio of 2:1 and (4) PBMCs alone. Samples from the surgical site were evaluated for mechanical properties, ICRS score and histological repair.

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  • A Review of Mesenchymal Stem Cell Injections for Osteoarthritis

    Abstract

    Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) injections for osteoarthritis is reviewed

    Methods: PubMed search was conducted to identify articles in English from 2003-2018 that used intraarticular injection (IA), cartilage repair, cartilage regeneration, chondral injury, adipose stem cells, bone marrow stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells, or autologous stem cells.

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a degenerative disease of diarthrodial joints characterized by loss of articular cartilage, deformity, and pain. The two greatest risk factors for OA are obesity and joint injury. Symptomatic OA is reported in 12% of American adults, with as many as 37% of adults demonstrating radiographic evidence of OA.

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  • Comparison of the Regenerative Effects of Platelet Rich Fibrin and Plasma Rich in Growth Factors on Injured Peripheral Nerve: An Experimental Study

    Abstract

    Purpose: The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of platelet rich fibrin (PRF) and plasma rich in growth factors (PRGF) on the injured peripheral nerve in the early period of healing.

    Results: Regarding electrophysiological evaluation, both the latency and amplitude values in D, PRF and PRGF groups were significantly lower than the C group (p> 0,05).

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  • Platelet-rich plasma injections for lateral epicondylitis reduce the need for surgical intervention

    Abstract

    Lateral epicondylitis, also known as “tennis elbow,” is a degenerative disorder of the common extensor origin of the lateral humeral epicondyle. The mainstay of treatment is non-operative and includes physiotherapy, activity modification, bracing, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and injections. There is a subgroup of patients however who do not respond to non-operative measures and require operative intervention.

    Methods: We conducted a retrospective review of prospectively collected data to assess whether the introduction of PRP injections for lateral epicondylitis led to a reduction in patients subsequently undergoing surgical release.

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  • Autologous platelet rich plasma versus corticosteroid injection for chronic plantar fasciitis: a prospective controlled randomized comparative clinical study

    Abstract

    Primary objective was to evaluate and compare the effectiveness of autologous platelet rich plasma (PRP) and steroid injections in chronic cases of plantar fasciitis.

    Methods: The present study was a prospective cohort study; 140 consecutive patients with chronic plantar fasciitis were enrolled and randomized in two groups: One receives the Platelet rich plasma (PRP) therapy (study group) and another receiving corticosteroid injection (control group). The outcomes in both groups are then evaluate and compared using visual analogue scale (VAS) and American Orthopaedic foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) scale at 1month, 3month and 6 month post injection. The level of significance was set at p < 0.05.

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  • Platelet-rich plasma and corticosteroids in the treatment of rotator cuff impingement syndrome: randomized clinical trial

    Abstract

    Objective: This research aimed to study the effectiveness of PRP in the treatment of patients with impact of rotator cuff syndrome compared to treatment with subacromial corticosteroid injection.

    Methods: This was a double-blinded, randomized, comparative clinical trial. Patients were clinically evaluated by the DASH score, the UCLA Shoulder Rating Scale, and the Constant Shoulder Score on the day of application, and after one month, 3 months, and 6 months.

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  • Intradiscal Injection of Autologous Platelet-Rich Plasma Releasate to Treat Discogenic Low Back Pain: A Preliminary Clinical Trial

    Abstract

    Purpose: To determine the safety and initial efficacy of intradiscal injection of autologous platelet-rich plasma (PRP) releasate in patients with discogenic low back pain.

    Conclusions: We demonstrated that intradiscal injection of autologous PRP releasate in patients with low back pain was safe, with no adverse events observed during follow-up. Future randomized controlled clinical studies should be performed to systematically evaluate the effects of this therapy.

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  • The effect of corticosteroid versus platelet-rich plasma injection therapies for the management of lateral epicondylitis: A systematic review

    Abstract

    Introduction:Lateral epicondylitis is a common musculoskeletal disorder of the upper limb.Corticosteroid injection has been widely used as a major mode of treatment. However, better understanding of the pathophysiology of the disease led to a major change in treating the disease, with new options including platelet-rich plasma (PRP) are currently used. Objectives/research aim : To systematically evaluate the effect of corticosteroid versus PRP injections for the treatment of LE.

    Conclusion: Corticosteroid injections provide rapid therapeutic effect in the short-term with recurrence of symptoms afterwards, compared to the relatively slower but longer-term effect of platelet-rich plasma.

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  • Allogeneic Platelet Releasate Preparations Derived via a Novel Rapid Thrombin Activation Process Promote Rapid Growth and Increased BMP-2 and BMP-4 Expression in Human Adipose-Derived Stem Cells

    Abstract

    The administration of human adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) represents a promising regenerative therapy for the treatment of orthopedic injuries. While ASCs can be easily isolated from liposuction-derived adipose tissue, most clinical applications will likely require in vitro culture expansion of these cells using nonxenogeneic components. In this study, platelet releasate was generated using a novel rapid thrombin activation method (tPR). ASCs grown in media supplemented with tPR proliferated much faster than ASCs grown in media supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum. The cells also retained the ability to differentiate along chondrogenic, adipogenic, and osteogenic lineages. The tPR cultured ASCs displayed elevated expression of BMP-4 (5.7 ± 0.97-fold increase) and BMP-2 (4.7 ± 1.3-fold increase) and decreased expression of PDGF-B (4.0 ± 1.4-fold decrease) and FGF-2 (33 ± 9.0-fold decrease). No significant changes in expression were seen with TGF-β and VEGF. This pattern of gene expression was consistent across different allogeneic tPR samples and different ASC lines. The use of allogeneic rapidly activated tPR to culture ASCs is associated with both an increased cell yield and a defined gene expression profile making it an attractive option for cell expansion prior to cell-based therapy for orthopedic applications.

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  • Leukocyte depletion does not affect the in vitro healing ability of platelet rich plasma

    Abstract

    The clinical use of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) containing or deprived of leukocytes remains a subject of debate and a controversial issue. It is not yet clear whether leukocyte content has a positive or negative effect on tissue healing processes. Several studies, conducted mainly in the orthopedic field, support the use of leukocyte‑poor (LP) PRP, whereas other studies have not identified any significant differences between the use of LP and leukocyte‑rich PRP. In the present study, the role of leukocytes contained in PRP was assessed to verify their in vitro effect on fibroblasts and endothelial cells, which have a leading role in the biological processes associated with wound healing (including angiogenesis and matrix remodeling). The original sample of PRP was divided into two aliquots, one of which remained unaltered, while the other was deprived of leukocytes. The two aliquots were used in in vitro tests in order to verify the effects of leukocytes on proliferation, wound healing and tube formation, and in molecular analyses of growth factor and enzyme content. The present results highlighted a substantial overlap between the two formulations.

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  • Platelet lysate enhances synovial fluid multipotential stromal cells functions: Implications for therapeutic use

    Abstract

    Background Aims: Although intra-articular injection of platelet products is increasingly used for joint regenerative approaches, there are few data on their biological effects on joint-resident multipotential stromal cells (MSCs), which are directly exposed to the effects of these therapeutic strategies. Therefore, this study investigated the effect of platelet lysate (PL) on synovial fluid-derived MSCs (SF-MSCs), which in vivo have direct access to sites of cartilage injury.

    Methods: SF-MSCs were obtained during knee arthroscopic procedures (N = 7). Colony forming unit-fibroblast (CFU-F), flow-cytometric phenotyping, carboxyfluorescein succinimidyl ester-based immunomodulation for T-cell and trilineage differentiation assays were performed using PL and compared with standard conditions.

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