Stem Cell Treatment Houston

  • Human Cells, Tissues, and Cellular and Tissue-Based Products From Adipose Tissue: Regulatory Considerations; Draft Guidance for Industry; Availability

    Summary

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability of a draft document entitled \"Human Cells, Tissues, and Cellular and Tissue-Based Products (HCT/Ps) from Adipose Tissue: Regulatory Considerations; Draft Guidance for Industry\" dated December 2014. The draft guidance document provides sponsors, clinicians, and other establishments that manufacture and use adipose tissue, with recommendations for complying with the regulatory framework for HCT/Ps. For purposes of applying the HCT/P regulatory framework, FDA considers connective tissue, including adipose tissue, to be a structural tissue. This draft guidance is not final nor is it in effect at this time.

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  • AUTOLOGOUS BONE MARROW DERIVED MESENCHYMAL STEM CELLS DOES HELP IN EARLY OSTEOARTHRITIS KNEE

    Abstract

    Introduction: There is no effective therapy available today that alters the pathobiologic course of osteoarthritis. Recent advances have shown Mesenchymal stem cells to be a potential disease modifying treatment. Considering the tissue differentiation property and vast paracrine effects of MSCs we proposed the present study to find out the safety and efficacy of Mesenchymal stem cells in osteoarthritis of knee joint.

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  • Multipotent Mesenchymal Stem Cell Treatment for Discogenic Low Back Pain and Disc Degeneration

    Abstract

    Low back pain with resultant loss of function, decreased productivity, and high economic costs is burdensome for both the individual and the society. Evidence suggests that intervertebral disc pathology is a major contributor to spine-related pain and degeneration. When commonly used conservative therapies fail, traditional percutaneous or surgical options may be beneficial for pain relief but are suboptimal because of their inability to alter disc microenvironment catabolism, restore disc tissue, and/or preserve native spine biomechanics. Percutaneously injected Multipotent Mesenchymal Stem Cell (MSC) therapy has recently gained clinical interest for its potential to revolutionarily treat disc-generated (discogenic) pain and associated disc degeneration. Unlike previous therapies to date, MSCs may uniquely offer the ability to improve discogenic pain and provide more sustained improvement by reducing disc microenvironment catabolism and regenerating disc tissue. Consistent treatment success has the potential to create a paradigm shift with regards to the treatment of discogenic pain and disc degeneration.

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  • Translation of cell therapy into clinical practice: validation of an application procedure for bone marrow progenitor cells and platelet rich plasma.

    Abstract

    Tissue regeneration can be improved by local application of autologous bone marrow derived progenitor cells (BMSC) and platelet rich plasma (PRP). However, there is a lack of standardized application procedures for clinical use. Therefore, a technique in accordance with the guidelines for advanced therapies medical products of the European Medicine Agency was developed and established.In detail, a process for the isolation and formulation of autologous bone marrow cells (BMC) and PRP in a clinical setting was validated. To investigate the influence of storage time and temperature on gel formation and gel stability, different concentrations of BMC were stored with and without additional platelets, thrombin and fibrinogen and analyzed over a period of 28 days. In addition, cell vitality using a live-dead staining and migration ability of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) in the gel clot was investigated.For an optimized stable gel clot, human BMC and PRP should be combined with 10% to 20% fibrinogen (9 mg/mL to 18 mg/mL) and 5% to 20% thrombin (25 I.E. to 100 I.E.). Both freshly prepared and stored cells for 1 to 7 days had a stable consistence over 28 days at 37

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  • Effect of bone marrow-derived stem cells on chondrocytes from patients with osteoarthritis

    Abstract

    Increasing numbers of individuals are suffering from osteoarthritis every year, and the directed intra-articular injection of bone marrow stem cells has provided a promising treatment strategy for osteoarthritis. Although a number of studies have demonstrated that intra-articular injection of bone marrow stem cells produced desirable results, the mechanism underlying this effect has not been elucidated. In the current study, the effect of bone marrow stem cells on chondrocytes from patients with osteoarthritis was observed in a co-culture system. Human chondrocytes were obtained from patients with osteoarthritis who underwent surgical procedures and bone marrow stem cells were obtained from bone marrow aspirates, and then the chondrocytes were then cultured alone or cocultured with bone marrow stem cells in 0.4-

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  • Real-time-guided bone regeneration around standardized critical size calvarial defects using bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells and collagen membrane with and without using tricalcium phosphate: an in vivo micro-computed tomographic and histologic

    Abstract

    The aim of the present real time in vivo micro-computed tomography (µCT) and histologic experiment was to assess the efficacy of guided bone regeneration (GBR) around standardized calvarial critical size defects (CSD) using bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs), and collagen membrane (CM) with and without tricalcium phosphate (TCP) graft material. In the calvaria of nine female Sprague-Dawley rats, full-thickness CSD (diameter 4.6 mm) were created under general anesthesia. Treatment-wise, rats were divided into three groups. In group 1, CSD was covered with a resorbable CM; in group 2, BMSCs were filled in CSD and covered with CM; and in group 3, TCP soaked in BMSCs was placed in CSD and covered with CM. All defects were closed using resorbable sutures. Bone volume and bone mineral density of newly formed bone (NFB) and remaining TCP particles and rate of new bone formation was determined at baseline, 2, 4, 6, and 10 weeks using in vivo µCT. At the 10th week, the rats were killed and calvarial segments were assessed histologically. The results showed that the hardness of NFB was similar to that of the native bone in groups 1 and 2 as compared to the NFB in group 3. Likewise, values for the modulus of elasticity were also significantly higher in group 3 compared to groups 1 and 2. This suggests that TCP when used in combination with BMSCs and without CM was unable to form bone of significant strength that could possibly provide mechanical “lock” between the natural bone and NFB. The use of BMSCs as adjuncts to conventional GBR initiated new bone formation as early as 2 weeks of treatment compared to when GBR is attempted without adjunct BMSC therapy.

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  • Bone Marrow Stem Cells in Response to Intervertebral Disc-Like Matrix Acidity and Oxygen Concentration - Implications for Cell-Based Regenerative Therapy

    Abstract

    Study Design. In vitro culture of porcine bone marrow stem cells (BMSCs) in varying pH microenvironments in a 3D hydrogel system.

    Objective. To characterise the response of BMSCs to varying pH environments (blood (pH 7.4), healthy IVD (pH 7.1), mildly degenerated IVD (pH 6.8) and severely degenerated IVD (pH 6.5) in 3D culture under normoxic (20%) and hypoxic (5%) conditions.

    Summary of Background Data. The intervertebral disc (IVD) is an avascular organ relying on diffusion of essential nutrients through the cartilaginous endplates (CEPs) thereby creating a challenging microenvironment. Within a degenerated IVD, oxygen and glucose concentrations decrease further (<5% oxygen, <5 mM glucose) and matrix acidity (

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  • Effect of Dynamic Culture and Periodic Compression on Human Mesenchymal Stem Cell Proliferation and Chondrogenesis

    Abstract

    We have recently developed a bioreactor that can apply both shear and compressive forces to engineered tissues in dynamic culture. In our system, alginate hydrogel beads with encapsulated human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) were cultured under different dynamic conditions while subjected to periodic, compressive force. A customized pressure sensor was developed to track the pressure fluctuations when shear forces and compressive forces were applied.

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  • Intra-Articular Injection of Synovium-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells with Hyaluronic Acid Can Repair Articular Cartilage Defects in a Can ine Model

    Abstract

    Objective:

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate effectiveness of intra-articular injection of synovium-derived mesenchymal stem cells (SMSCs) and hyaluronic acid (HA) for the treatment of articular cartilage defects in a canine model.

    Methods:

    Forty-eight knees of 24 beagle dogs were randomly assigned to 16 groups (n=3) according to both the number of injected SMSCs (0.5×—105cells, 5×—106cells, 5×—107cells) and the concentration of HA (0%, 0.01%, 0.1%, 0.5%). A partial-thickness cartilage defect was created in the medial femoral condyle under arthroscopy. After seven weeks, autologous SMSCs with or without 1 ml HA were percutaneously injected into the injured knee. In the control group, 1 ml saline was injected. Twelve weeks after the injection, evaluation was performed using the International Cartilage Repair Society (ICRS) visual assessment scale and the modified O\'Driscoll histological score.

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  • Stem Cell Therapies in Orthopaedic Trauma

    Marcucio, Ralph S. PhD; Nauth, Aaron MD; Giannoudis, Peter V. MD, FRCS; Bahney, Chelsea PhD; Piuzzi, Nicolas S. MD; Muschler, George MD; Miclau, Theodore III MDJournal of Orthopaedic Trauma December 2015 Vol. 29 - Issue : p S24-S27

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  • Using mesenchymal stem cells as a therapy for bone regeneration and repairing

    Abstract

    Bone is a unique tissue which could regenerate completely after injury rather than heal itself with a scar. Compared with other tissues the difference is that, during bone repairing and regeneration, after the inflammatory phase the mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are recruited to the injury site and differentiate into either chondroblasts or osteoblasts precursors, leading to bone repairing and regeneration. Besides these two precursors, the MSCs can also differentiate into adipocyte precursors, skeletal muscle precursors and some other mesodermal cells. With this multilineage potentiality, the MSCs are probably used to cure bone injury and other woundings in the near future. Here we will introduce the recent developments in understanding the mechanism of MSCs action in bone regeneration and repairing.

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  • A study of autologous stem cells therapy assisted regeneration of cartilage in avascular bone necrosis

    Abstract

    Application of \'regenerative medicine\' has given a new hope to surgeons for the treatment of several chronic diseases and disorders including severe orthopedic conditions. There are a myriad of orthopedic conditions and injuries that presently have limited therapeutic treatments and could benefit from new developing therapies in regenerative medicine with the help of stem cell therapy1. Regenerative medicine therapies are mainly based on the applications of stem cells. Stem cells play a vital role in orthopedic treatments and the studies have shown to have promising results in repair of bone, tendon, cartilage including avascular necrosis (AVN), spondylitis etc. Bone and cartilage regeneration ability of stem cells has been demonstrated clinically. However, success rate may not be same in every case and it depends on the patient profile. Several factors can be responsible for the same which include patient\'s immune response, the type and grade of the disease, which along with other confounding factors decide the outcome of the treatment. In this paper we have presented some of the orthopedic case studies performed through autologous transplantation of the stem cells.

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  • Clinical Trials with Mesenchymal Stem Cells: An Update

    Abstract

    In the last year, the promising features of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), including their regenerative properties and ability to differentiate into diverse cell lineages, have generated great interest among researchers whose work has offered intriguing perspectives on cell-based therapies for various diseases. Currently the most commonly used adult stem cells in regenerative medicine, MSCs can be isolated from several tissues, exhibit a strong capacity for replication in vitro, and can differentiate into osteoblasts, chondrocytes, and adipocytes. However, heterogeneous procedures for isolating and cultivating MSCs among laboratories have prompted the International Society for Cellular Therapy (ISCT) to issue criteria for identifying unique populations of these cells. Consequently, the isolation of MSCs according to ISCT criteria has produced heterogeneous, non-clonal cultures of stromal cells containing stem cells with different multipotential properties, committed progenitors, and differentiated cells. Though the nature and functions of MSCs remain unclear, non-clonal stromal cultures obtained from bone marrow and other tissues currently serve as sources of putative MSCs for therapeutic purposes, and several findings underscore their effectiveness in treating different diseases. To date, 493 MSC-based clinical trials, either complete or ongoing, appear in the database of the US National Institute of Health. In the present paper, we provide a comprehensive review of MSC-based clinical trials conducted worldwide that scrutinizes MSCs\' biological properties, elucidates recent clinical findings and clinical trial phases of investigation, highlights MSCs\' therapeutic effects, and identifies principal criticisms of the use of these cells. In particular, we analyze clinical trials using MSCs for representative diseases, including hematological disease, graft-versus-host disease, organ transplantation, diabetes, inflammatory diseases, and diseases in the liver, kidney, and lung, as well as cardiovascular, bone and cartilage, neurological, and autoimmune diseases.

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  • Knee cartilage defect: marrow stimulating techniques

    Abstract

    Painful chondral defects of the knee are very difficult problems. The incidence of these lesions in the general population is not known since there is likely a high rate of asymptomatic lesions. The rate of lesions found during arthroscopic exam is highly variable, with reports ranging from 11 to 72

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  • Therapeutic application of mesenchymal stem cells in osteoarthritis

    Abstract

    Introduction: Osteoarthritis (OA) is a degenerative disease characterized by cartilage degradation and subchondral bone alterations. This disease represents a global public health problem whose prevalence is rapidly growing with the increasing aging of the population. With the discovery of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) as possible therapeutic agents, their potential for repairing cartilage damage in OA is under investigation.

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  • Clinical Outcome of Bone Marrow Concentrate in Knee Osteoarthritis

    Abstract

    Background: Knee osteoarthritis is an increasing health concern in the adult population. Nonsurgical treatment options for pain reduction and function improvement are limited in number and provide only short-term relief. The potential of regenerative therapies to go beyond temporary symptom reduction and delay or negate the need for total knee joint arthroplasty is enticing to both patients and providers.

    Purpose: This study evaluated the clinical efficacy of autologous intra-articular bone marrow concentrate with autologous lipoaspirate as a treatment option for osteoarthritis of the knee. Additionally, bone marrow concentrate samples from a patient population subset not necessarily enrolled in this study, but IRB approved, were sent for outside laboratory analysis.

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  • Cartilage Regeneration: How Do We Meet the Increasing Demands of an Ageing Population?

    Editorial

    Globally, hundreds of millions of people are affected by musculoskeletal disorders (~10 million in the UK) [1]. Data presented from a pan-European study showed that one in three people are affected by musculoskeletal pain and disorders of the musculoskeletal system are the most common work-related health problem. From a survey of individuals who retired early on medical grounds or were on long-term sickness benefit, up to 60% cited musculoskeletal pain as the cause [2]. As well as these societal implications there is a significant economic cost associated with musculoskeletal health. The National Health Service (NHS) spends over

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  • RANTES and SDF-1 Are Keys in Cell-based Therapy of TMJ Osteoarthritis

    Abstract

    The present study aimed to investigate the therapeutic effect of injections of local bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) on osteoarthritis (OA) of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and to explore the role of stromal cell-derived factor 1 (SDF-1) and regulated on activation, normal T-cell expressed and secreted (RANTES) in this effect. Fundamentally, OA of the TMJ was induced by unilateral anterior crossbite in mice. Exogenous green fluorescent protein-labeled BMSCs (GFP-BMSCs) were weekly injected into the TMJ region for 4, 8, and 12 wk. The reparative effects of exogenous GFP-BMSCs were investigated by morphological observation and micro-computed tomography. The differentiation of GFP-BMSCs in the cartilage was examined by double immunofluorescence of GFPs with type II collagen, and the expression of related factors in the condylar cartilage was quantified by real-time polymerase chain reaction. The role of RANTES and SDF-1 in the therapeutic effect of exogenous BMSCs was examined by both in vitro and in vivo studies. The OA cartilage of the TMJ displays a synchronous increase in SDF-1 and RANTES expression and a higher capability of attracting the migration of GFP-BMSCs. The implanted GFP-BMSCs differentiated into type II collagen-positive cells and reversed cartilage degradation and subchondral bone loss in mice with OA of the TMJ. The migration of GFP-BMSCs towards OA cartilage and the rescuing effect of GFP-BMSC injections were impaired by the inhibitors of C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4) and C-C chemokine receptor type 1 (CCR1), which are the receptors of SDF-1 and RANTES, respectively. Our data indicated that SDF-1/CXCR4 and RANTES/CCR1 signals are pivotal and function synergistically in the recruitment of GFP-BMSCs towards degraded cartilage in mice OA of the TMJ.

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  • A dose response analysis of a specific bone marrow concentrate treatment protocol for knee osteoarthritis

    Abstract

    Background

    Prior studies describing the treatment of symptomatic knee osteoarthritis with injections of bone marrow concentrate have provided encouraging results. The relationship between the cellular dose contained within the bone marrow concentrate and efficacy of the treatment, however, is unclear. In the present study we describe clinical outcomes for symptomatic knee osteoarthritis in relation to higher and lower cell concentrations contained within a bone marrow concentrate treatment protocol.

    Methods

    Data from an ongoing patient registry was culled to identify 373 patients that received bone marrow concentrate injections for the treatment of 424 osteoarthritic knee joints. The clinical scales for these patients were assessed at baseline and then tracked post-procedure at 1, 3, 6 and 12

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  • Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Regenerative Medicine: Focus on Articular Cartilage and Intervertebral Disc Regeneration

    Abstract

    Musculoskeletal disorders represent a major cause of disability and morbidity globally and result in enormous costs for health and social care systems. Development of cell-based therapies is rapidly proliferating in a number of disease areas, including musculoskeletal disorders. Novel biological therapies that can effectively treat joint and spine degeneration are high priorities in regenerative medicine. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) isolated from bone marrow (BM-MSCs), adipose tissue (AD-MSCs) and umbilical cord (UC-MSCs) show considerable promise for use in cartilage and intervertebral disc (IVD) repair. This review article focuses on stem cell based therapeutics for cartilage and IVD repair in the context of the rising global burden of musculoskeletal disorders. We discuss the biology MSCs and chondroprogenitor cells and specifically focus on umbilical cord/Wharton\'s jelly derived MSCs and examine their potential for regenerative applications. We also summarize key components of the molecular machinery and signaling pathways responsible for the control of chondrogenesis and explore biomimetic scaffolds and biomaterials for articular cartilage and IVD regeneration. This review explores the exciting opportunities afforded by MSCs and discusses the challenges associated with cartilage and IVD repair and regeneration. There are still many technical challenges associated with isolating, expanding, differentiating, and pre-conditioning MSCs for subsequent implantation into degenerate joints and the spine. However, the prospect of combining biomaterials and cell-based therapies that incorporate chondrocytes, chondroprogenitors and MSCs leads to the optimistic view that interdisciplinary approaches will lead to significant breakthroughs in regenerating musculoskeletal tissues, such as the joint and the spine in the near future.

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